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Katie Lott

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Katie Lott is an American singer songwriter who discovered me on Twitter and followed me.  Like what I heard and this is what she has to say.

http:/www.katielott.com

1. What was the inspiration for the EP and what inspired you to get into music?

I don’t think there was ever a moment that I decided I wanted to get
into music, because it’s always been a part of my life. I’ve always
been fascinated by music and its possibilities. I started playing
piano when I was 6 and violin when I was 9. I started writing music
around middle school, which led to me studying music composition at
Birmingham-Southern College. In college and high school, I wrote
primarily for piano, string quartet, and orchestra. After I graduated,
I started to get more into songwriting, which is why I decided to
start performing live and release a few of my songs on an EP.

2. How did the songwriting process go for the EP?

It went differently for every song. I wrote “Ballerinas” while I was
reading a book on lyric writing. The book advised that a songwriter
should never write a song that paints the singer in a bad light. Which
is absolutely ridiculous. I think the most relatable songs to me are
the ones that make the singer vulnerable and exposed, and maybe a
little insane, too. “Floodlights” started with an online random word
generator, which is a technique I use a lot for lyric ideas. I saw the
word floodlights and thought, that’s my next song.
“Criminal” started as an imitation of ZZ Ward’s songwriting style. I
spent a few weeks analyzing her album and incorporated some of those
ideas into the song.

3. What was the recording process like for the EP?

I actually didn’t intend to the release the EP when I first started
recording it. I meant for it to be a demo for venues I was trying to
book shows at. But then I ended up spending so much time on it, I
decided to release it. I recorded the album in my apartment, with the
help of my boyfriend, who produced, mixed, and mastered the album.

4. Did you prepare for the recording process or what is it a case of
see what happens in the studio?

I prepared a lot for it, but since I was recording it at home, I got
to take my time and do a lot of experimenting while I was recording. I
ended up adding a lot of harmonies that I didn’t originally plan on.

5. How was the recording process different to earlier material?

N/A (This was the first project I’ve recorded)

6. What did you learn from recording the album that you will take away
for future releases?

I learned how time-consuming the whole process can be, and how
beneficial it can be to practice singing with a microphone, so I can
hear all the subtleties of my voice.

7. Are you happy how things have gone so far for yourself music wise?

YES! I’m constantly being surprised by opportunities that keep popping
up and new people who are hearing my music every day. I’ve gotten so
much great feedback from friends and fans and I can’t wait to release
and record more of my music.

8. What buzz do you get out of playing live?

I just love being able to share my music with a live audience – it’s a
completely different atmosphere than recording in an empty room.

9. Do you have rituals before playing a show?

I don’t really have a ritual, but I do focus on breathing a lot to
calm myself down if I’m nervous.

10. What do you love about playing music, what does it do for you?

I think my favorite part of the process is writing music. There’s
nothing like playing through a song you just wrote and being able to
play it while it’s fresh.

11. What inspires you now when writing music?

I think the biggest inspiration for me is great musicians. Artists who
work really hard at their craft and produce great music. Jillette
Johnson, Banks, and Ryn Weaver, are a few of my current obsessions.

12. Do you have moments where you just can’t write?

I think everyone does. Fortunately, I don’t ever have deadlines, so
I’m usually able to take a break from the song and come back later.
There are days when I’ll be stuck on one line of a song and give up,
only to come back the next day and write the perfect line in 5
minutes.

 

 

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