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Charm of Finches

One of the most exciting acts of out of Australia are Charm of Finches. I knew I had to interview them. With a new song out. This is what they had to say.

https://charmoffinchesband.com

 

1. How did you get into music?

We have been around music all our lives. Our mum taught choirs and dad was obsessed with Bob Dylan. Plus, we went to Steiner school, where you sing every day. We started busking, singing three part harmonies outside the local veggie shop. We were keen to save enough cash to fly to Ireland We were 11 and 8 then, and our friend Bel sang with us. We called ourselves The Highway Sisters! Ha ha!

2. What inspired the new song The Bridge?

We were on our road trip just before Christmas to go play at Woodford Folk Festival in Queensland. We were walking across a bridge and came upon a group of young people who were obviously grieving. It turned out their friend had jumped off that bridge during  party and passed away. We felt pretty moved by that experience and it stayed with us. We knew what it felt like to lose a friend at that age. It’s very intense and confusing. We wrote “The Bridge ” that evening.

3. Were you happy how it has been received?

We always just really want to connect with people with our music. A lot of people have been contacting us saying they find the song beautiful and moving and haunting. All those things are good! Music is all about connection.

4. How does a song start for you?

So many different ways. Sometimes it comes out as lyrics, then guitar riffs, chords and a sung melody line. Sometime it’s the guitar or banjo riff or a chord progression first. We collaborate a whole lot now, so we are constantly running in and out of each other’s bedrooms with new ideas and melody lines. (we live together – very handy for a band!)

 5. Where do you get your inspiration from?

Inspiration comes from our own experiences- about being a teenager , about seeing what our friends are going through. Being in nature inspired us a lot, and often we are info;uenced by the books we are reading. WE have a song , In The Gloaming”, which was inspired by our own experience of grief but also we were inspired by the novel “Kitchen” by Japanese author Banana Yoshimoto.

 6. Has your songwriting changed from when you were starting out?

At first Mabel wrote the songs, and Ivy added the harmonies. Now were are co-writing and the songs seem to be formed differently. That’ a hard question, because every new song comes out as a little surprise and feels entirely fresh and new.

7. What has been the best piece of advice you have given about your music career?

George Jackson from One Up Two Down, one of the best bluegrass bands you are likely to come across in our humble opinion, told us to do music for the love of it! Don’t do it for fame, do it for the pure love of music.

8. How did your album Staring at the Starry Ceiling come about?

We had been playing at a lot of folk festivals 2015 – 2016 and had a whole bunch of songs we had been playing live a lot. We contacted Nick Huggins and asked if he would produce the album with us. He was the perfect collaborator, as it turned out,. He is so open creatively. He has no preconceptions, and also listened very carefully to our ideas. We also had a ridiculous amount of fun with him! Many laughs.

9. What was the recording process like was it different to the new song?

Recording the EP “Home” was virtually a live recording all done in a day and a half with minimal extra parts added (cello and some extra vocal harmonies). Staring at the Starry Ceiling was the opposite. A real studio album, with heaps of spontaneous arrangement decisions and on the spot melody compositions. We also recorded a fair bit of the strings at home. We wanted to play all the instruments ourselves, though we did get help with flute, percussion and a hammered dulcimer. Recording this single ” The Bridge” was similar to that, though we recorded everything at Nick’s studio and played everything ourselves.

10. What do you love about your local scene?

We have a lot of favourite musicians who live in Melbourne. Dan Parsons, The Maes, Domini Forster, Anna Cordell. WE have been so lucky to meet such lovely musicians on our travels around the folk festivals. Melbourne has so much music- we’re very spoilt. We do tend to see most of the bands at the festivals and gigs  we play at, though we do go to gigs a fair bit too, when we haven’t got too much homework!

11. Do you have set theme for your music or does it go with the flow and changes?

The themes seem to be pretty consistent at the moment. WE tend to be contemplating fate, mortality, grief, solitude and there is always a backdrop in nature. Emotions and the elements comes up a lot. Our new music video for The Bridge really is a perfect example of our inspirations and mood. There is a mythical quality to the story, and the natural world around us, the lakes and fields and rocks all play a role in our journey in life. Being young, you feel a lot! So having songwriting, and filmmaking (ie making music videos) is a perfect way to channel and transform the intense feelings into art.

12. Do like to write with out inspiration or distractions or do you need a bit of both?

We live in a tiny house with five people and a mastiff! So yeah, sometimes distractions are unavoidable. we did once go to a friend’s holiday house to finish a whole bunch of songs in peace and quiet. Maybe it was too quiet, cause we didn’t finish one! But we did write a new song.

13. How important is having a plan in place for your music?

We have clear ideas about what we want to do. We want to tour, ands we are already planning our 2020 UK/Canada tour. We know what kind of settings we like to play our music in, and we know who we love working with. We also have some crazy wish list items which we hope may actually happen! We would love to record with Sufjan Stevens for example!

14. How important is your brand Charm of Finches?

We don’t think of Charm of Finches as a brand. We think of Charm of Finches as our creative project. We’re very attached to it because we have poured a lot of love and creative energy into it. A lot of joy and beautiful collaborations too! Nick Huggins, Adalita, Emma McEvoy: lots of people who we love and admire have been involved with the finches and also mentored and inspired us. We’re pretty proud of what we have created so far. Having Charm of Finches is itself inspiration to keep creating and coming up with new music, new ideas and new goals. Charm of Finches is kind of a creative being of its own.

 

Cking

CKing is a Brisbane based rapper with a new song out. I dug it and this is what he had to say.

https://www.facebook.com/ckingtherapper/

1. How did you get into music?

When I was quite young I was introduced to the band Linkin Park, after learning their first two albums back to front I was introduced to Rappers like Tupac, Eminem and Biggie which was where I really started to gain interest. I started to rewrite their songs as my own, learning how to structure and how flows worked to each beat.

2. How did the inspiration for the song come about?

This song was inspired from a past relationship, giving her my everything, a situation happened where she no longer trusted me due to me having a lot of female attention at the time. She couldn’t handle it even though I made sure I let it be known that I was down for her and her only. She tries apologising after realising what she’s lost and I’ve heard it all before so I throw it all away.

3. How does a song start for you?

A song, especially like this starts with a story, a situation and how I’m really feeling about everything at the time reflects everything in the song.

4. Where do you get your inspiration from?

Emotions, I’m an emotional writer. Most of my music will come from a place within.

5. Has your songwriting changed from when you were starting out?

Absolutely, like a lot of my clients that I record will often start off writing bars as if they were sentences or paragraphs in the least.

I now have a process where I’ll write what I want the song to be about, write the hook as it’s the main part of it all then structure a story timeline within the first/second and or third verse.

6. What has been the best piece of advice you have given about your music career?

If you don’t invest in yourself, nobody else will.

7. Do you have set theme for your music or does it go with the flow and changes?

I’ll often set a theme before I write but it really depends on the mood and type of track it is.

8. Do like to write with out inspiration or distractions or do you need a bit of both?

Inspiration tracks usually turn out the best, distractions are something I’m still learning to deal with. Social media is a HUGE distraction that’ll constantly take my attention away from what I was doing.

9. How important is having a plan in place for your music?

I feel having a plan will make or break the song. Well thought out and planned projects to me seem more worth it in the long run.

10. How important is your brand Cking?

I’ve been known as Cking since I ever started to say I wanted to be a Rapper/Singer from a very young age. It just stuck.

Royal East

So these guys contacted me and I like what I heard and figure I would interview them for the site and this is what they had to say. With a new song out called Gin, this band is getting out there

https://www.facebook.com/royaleast/

1. How did you get into music?

As a band, music has always been an important part of our lives. Four-year-old Pat for example, used to walk around with a little battery powered tape deck listening to Pachelbel’s Canon on repeat (before music streaming was invented playing a song on repeat required significant commitment. Especially for a four-year-old). His first instrument was the violin at age 4, and took up drumming and singing a few years later.

2. How did the inspiration for the song come about?

Pat wrote “Gin” because he wanted a person to know how he was feeling about them at the time. It’s a collection of things that were important to him, and combines memories, experiences and emotions. This “Gin”, is brimming with nostalgia and hope.

3. How does a song start for you?

Song-writing is about sharing something. It starts with an idea of the sentiment that we want to share with whoever’s listening. We search for the elements that reflect that sentiment so that, when the listener turns on the track, they can hear that essential message.

4. Where do you get your inspiration from?

We’re inspired by a beat that forces you to move, a lyrics that makes you dream, or a melody that makes you smile. Also we’re constantly inspired by good musical performance, we go on band gigs and afterwards are raring to get back in the studio.

5. Has your songwriting changed from when you were starting out?

Our songwriting has changed a lot since we started out. Initially, the writing was based around a riff, and the idea grew organically in rehearsals – but it took too long and was time-intensive. Now we write full demos each and bring it to the band. We choose the best ones and jam them out until we’re happy with it.

6. What has been the best piece of advice you have been given about your music career?

Simply, to work hard. If we are serious about it we must put the time in to create a band that people want to listen to and support. This includes the musical elements of songwriting and live shows, but also building a strong brand and media presence.

7. Do you have set theme for your music or does it go with the flow and changes?

We have a theme for our music, but it leaves plenty of room for creativity and for our musical imagination to run wild. We aim to capture the vibe of an intimate yet outlandish house party with all of our best mates. We want our audience to be grooving and having a good time when they’re listening to our music.

8. Do like to write without inspiration or distractions or do you need a bit of both?

This is a mix throughout our songs and band members. Nick (drummer) likes to write the basis of a song without inspiration, but then uses a reference track when forming the production tones. Fraser (guitarist) likes to go into a track without any reference to bring his own style. This seems to be a strength so a song doesn’t take too many elements from one particular place.

9. How important is having a plan in place for your music?

Pretty important when you want to bridge the gap between friends and real fans. We’ve spent a while trying to find and refine our sound as a collective. We all have different influences and tastes that presents a challenge sometimes, but mostly it is our asset! We recently realised we’re an indie/pop band and the relief and freedom (paradoxically) that came with finding that was unreal.

10. How important is your brand Royal East?

We spend a huge amount of our time planning and managing the endless list of activities that accompany the writing, including the marketing so that people discover our music, managing our branding, and planning the direction we want to take our music. It’s such a massive part of music these days – to have the brand AND the music – so we do our best to do it well but also fun.

Jordan F

Photograph by Mark Owen

I flat out love Jordan F, his awesome sound is amazing. I finally saw him play last Saturday and he was on fire with a new album called Oblivion out now. I had to find out what he had to say so read on.

https://www.facebook.com/jordanfmusic/

1. What was the inspiration behind the new album?

1. I began writing ‘Oblivion’ in the wake of 2017. It is the summation of the progress over the past 8 years, which incorporates sounds from some of my earliest release to the present. It began with the track ‘Labyrinth’, which is a ten minute lovecraftian horror synth epic. The song opened up the sounds and tone for the world of ‘Oblivion’. Once I had established the sound pallet and texture, the writing process was quick but natural.

2. Are you happy how it’s been received?

2. Mostly yes, although it’s a lot harder these days for releases to stand out. I think most listeners of the genre still like to play it safe with cheesy melodies and lyrics, or electro thrash style music. Regardless, I’m personally proud of the release and that’s all I can ask of myself.

3. How was the recording process different to the last album?

3. There was nothing unique about the recording process compared to previous albums. All of the production and recording is done in Ableton with a handful of go-to plug-ins that I know very well. The only difference would be in the mixing stage where I buss all my audio tracks into groups, such as drums, bass, chords and melodies to glue the mix. I tried to take a step back from hyper analysing production and mixes.

4. Was the songwriting and style of music slightly different to your last album?

4. I wanted to write more interesting chord progressions, playing with a range of types as opposed to sticking with major and minor triads. It really strengthened the song writing of the album and helped convey a more compelling story.

5. How did you get involved with Vast Hill with doing an EP?

5. We discovered each other’s music on Triple J Unearthed and caught up to talk about music. They’re excellent musicians and understand theory really well and so we decided to combine our strengths to create a collaboration EP called ‘The Win’.

6. Was the recording process different to earlier material?

6. Yeah it was very different. Usually I just write by myself and send tracks off to vocalists for a top line, whereas this collaboration made me feel like I was in a synth pop band. We met up on weekends and just jammed out with ideas, where it be a melody, chord progression or a drum loop I had started. It felt really organic and there were no preconceived ideas of what we wanted to make. It was a process that I enjoyed a lot.

7. How does a song start for you?

7. I’ll start with a 16 bar loop and just start playing a chord progression. Drums are critical for the writing process as it establishes the wall of sound which everything needs to sit above. For example if you’re using a drum kick that lacks sub then you don’t want a bass sound that is going to squash the kick – it all needs to be complementary and relative to the frequency of each element. That’s why I think establishing the right drums is a critical from the outset.

8. Were you happy how your last album was received?

8. I’m always searching for ways to evolve my sound that maintains elements that have made me known, but also bring something new. Right now I’m working with a range of vocalists and just writing things that can make me dance. My previous music has been very soundtrack and concept driven so writing more pop and dance friendly songs is exciting for me!

9. Do you think sites like newretrowave help you as a musician?

9. Absolutely. NewRetroWave has given many artists so much exposure to audiences across the globe and I’ve been very fortunate to release an album with them.

10. What do you hope the rest of 2018 will have instore for your music?

10. Writing more music! Maybe a few shows! But I’m working towards a studio album that will feature lots of vocalists that I’ve met personally. Although in the early stages, I want this album to break away from the conceptual stuff I’ve done in the past.

11.  What is next for yourself?

11. Continuing the journey and just keeping inspired!

Reel Tapes

Reel Tapes are a good Aussie band and this is what they had to say about it all.

https://www.facebook.com/ReelTapes/

1. How did you get into music?
We began as mates at high school and had been playing together in the schools orchestras and ensembles for some time. As well as playing our guitars, some of us also dabbled with the cello, clarinet, saxophone and orchestral percussion. It would be pretty special if one day we got to play a concert with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. I’m sure our guitarist would be more than happy to have all of his solos played on the oboe.

2. How did the inspiration for the song come about?
The overall theme of the song centres around ideas of having desires and expectations and not having them met; whether they’re realistic or not. This leant itself to drawing on some pretty diverse sources of inspiration, including Pink Floyd, Norse mythology and my own life experiences.

3. How does a song start for you?
I just sort of feel it. I’ll just be jamming and something I play will sound really cool. I then play this riff about 500 times in different rooms of the house over a 3 week period. Then all of a sudden it’s finished! We then work on it as a band and lyrics are added.

4. Where do you get your inspiration from?
I don’t think we could pinpoint that precisely. The whole band listens to a lot of different styles and we often don’t like music that other band members are listening to. But this is great for creativity! Everyone brings their own vibe and style and I think you can hear this across our tracks. Deep Space is an indie rock track, but there are some twangy guitar leads and groovy funk keys. Each of our songs is unique, but we do have a sound that is Reel Tapes. This sonic is a kind of British rock inspired thing.

5. Has your songwriting changed from when you were starting out?
Nah, I’m never entirely sure how the songs come about… they just do!

6. What has been the best piece of advice you have been given about your music career?
You must enjoy it! If you aren’t having fun then what is the point? It’s expensive to play in a band and not much money is made, so it’s important that you do it because you love it.

7. Do you have set theme for your music or does it go with the flow and changes?
We play two types of songs:
1) Banger party tracks about going to parties and partying
2) Deeper tracks with plenty of groove and feel
So I guess the answers is whatever we feel like!

8. Do you like to write with out inspiration or distractions or do you need a bit of both?
Our band is a bit of a circus at times, but that’s just who we are. A bit weird. We try to harness this, but sometimes we just need to sit down and seriously work out what we are doing and how we can improve it.

9. How important is having a plan in place for your music?
Plans are everything! We need to plan our set list, how we will get to the gig, how we will get home again after drinking all of the rider beers. We also want to make sure that everyone has a chance to hear our music, so planning how to get it into everyone’s ears is also key.

10. How important is your brand?
It’s important for us to present who we really are. We are fun band with up-tempo songs that are enjoyable. We want you to know that we are fun and cool people. I know that sounds super lame – but trust me we are.

City Of The Weak

City Of The Weak are a great American band and one of the hardest working. With their new album Pulling Teeth out now. Stef w/ an F answered my questions and the go check out their tunes.

https://www.cityoftheweakofficial.com

1. How did you get into music?

When I was a kid growing up, I was always really lonely. I wrote stories which turned into poetry, which turned into song lyrics once I was gifted a piano from my grandma around age 8. I wasn’t really exposed to a whole lot of music since I was from a small town & my parents didn’t listen to music. So whenever I wanted to hear something, I just wrote what i felt like hearing.

2. How did the inspiration for the album come about?

Working in the music industry & dealing with all the bullshit that you come across is literally pulling teeth. Everyone has an opinion about what you need to do different or better, & everyone has something to say. There’s never merit behind any of it, & you have to remember that one person’s opinion is just that; it’s an OPINION. We’ve never fit in with any of the cliques that come in the rock scene, nor do we want to. Pulling Teeth is our raw, real story that showcases exactly who we are and why we are here to stay.

3. How did the recording and production process go for the album?

We went into the studio in May 2016 w/ Craig Owens & Jordan Disorbo to get 3 songs done. Then we came back Oct/Nov 2016 & finished the rest of the album. Working with Craig & Jordan was literally the dream team. It was so great to work with a team that was insanely invested in authentic, original work. It was never about “you can’t do that cuz that won’t sell” or “you can’t say that because it’s too specific” like working with a lot of producers is. It was quite the opposite, & Craig encouraged me to get deeper & more specific, & it felt great to say all the things that I’ve been wanting to say. It felt amazing not to be stifled in our creativity. We had definitely been in a box for awhile, & breaking out was fucking phenomenal.

4. Was the recording process different to earlier releases?

Yeah, we really took things slower this time around & made sure things were recorded exactly how we wanted them. We just were a lot more mature & more familiar with the recording process. Our first two EP’s were very experimental & we were very new at the whole process so we just went with the flow. This time around we really took charge.

5. Has your songwriting changed from when you were starting out?

Oh yes! Our first two EP’s were written solely with jam sessions. Everyone plays their part in rehearsal & when you get to the studio everyone is discovering what things sound like for the first time ever. For “Pulling Teeth” we demoed everything out beforehand, & listened to what we were doing before making final decisions about what to lay down.

6. What has been the best piece of advice you have been given about your music career?

“Enjoy the journey because being on top isn’t what it seems.”

7. Do you have set theme for your music or does it go with the flow and changes?

We are very socially conscious so we like to address injustices that we see around us, we’ve written about child abuse, animal rights, gay rights, & more. Obviously whatever issues we are facing in our lives at the moment are our biggest inspiration. A common theme throughout our career has been about not giving up when the world is against you, & that you are in control of your own life.

8. Do like to write with out inspiration or distractions or do you need a bit of both?

I like to write just a few minutes every day. I feel like all my best ideas come right away. The longer I sit there trying to think about things, the more forced it becomes. 20 minutes at a time is what works for me.

9. How important is having a plan in place for your music?

Having a plan is everything. So many bands fail at various stages of their careers, simply because they didn’t have a plan in place. You have to be prepared for everything, & know how to face obstacles when they arise.

10. How important is your brand City Of The Weak?

Our brand is everything. We are very edgy, modern, & we don’t give a fuck what people think. We are more than just a band, we want to build an empire. We want to lead a movement of people who don’t fit in anywhere, people who have been the underdog & been underestimated. We want to show people that they are not what other people think about them. They define themselves.

White Bay

White Bay are an Aussie band doing good things, this is what they had to say.

https://www.facebook.com/whitebaymusic/

1. How did you get into music?

Dennis, Rory, and myself (Sam) all began our varied musical journeys at a young age. We emerged as young contemporary musicians from differing musical backgrounds, though we all share common interests and are driven equally by our passion to live and breathe music. Rory started learning guitar at 7, Dennis started playing guitar and bass at 12, and I started with Classical Piano from age 5.

2. How did the inspiration for the song come about?

In My Head was inspired by, and written after, an exhausting and trialling relationship that I (Sam) had recently come out of. The lyrical content and story is generally built around those feelings, while the structure of the song came together in conjunction with the development of the story.

3. How does a song start for you?

Well, this song (In My Head) in particular was written around the main riff. So this one started with a riff! It varies on a song-by-song basis though, really. Sometimes a song is conceptualised as a theme or idea before an instrument is touched. Other times it’s a combination of moments of inspiration and actually playing around on the guitar alongside vocal improvisations. Sometimes as a lyricist and melody writer I’ll mumble gibberish around a vocal melody while playing progressions and see what comes out!

4. Where do you get your inspiration from?

Inspiration varies each day! We all have eclectic musical tastes and draw on these depending on what we’re into or listening to on a certain day. Personally, I experience erratic changes in what I feel like listening to on an hourly basis. Beyond the band, Rory and myself both have degrees in classical composition, while Dennis is currently finishing his degree in contemporary performance. Basically, we all draw our inspiration from a wide-range of influences. We all share big rock influences such as Metallica, Nirvana, Foo Fighters… But we all have separate influences we bring to the band too. I personally love vocalists John Fogerty (CCR), Chris Cornell, Kurt Nilsen (a Norwegian singer not many people know!), while Rory loves super heavy bands like Meshuggah, Dream Theatre, and Dennis loves The Offspring and heaps of others!

5. Has your songwriting changed from when you were starting out?

Yeah, it’s changed. We’re always learning and listening to things we like. We have a sound we like, but moving forward and not getting stuck to one sound is something we think is natural and interesting. We’ve already written EP number 2, even though we haven’t even released our first one yet, and theres a development or change in the style and sound.

6. What has been the best piece of advice you have given about your music career?

There may not be one singular piece of advice but more so an overall sense and understanding that it’s hard to make a living as a musician. Quite often you’re subsisting and getting by. Being told over and over that it’s hard to make a living as a musician has made us work harder! Basically, being forewarned about it and being told it may not be the best choice as a career pushed us to work harder.

7. Do you have set theme for your music or does it go with the flow and changes?

We don’t have a set theme. We’re writing what we like at the time and what we think sounds good, presenting that, and hoping other people like it too.

8. Do like to write with out inspiration or distractions or do you need a bit of both?

Being inspired is what drives us as musicians. I need to be inspired to write something I really care about. If I’m uninspired, chances are it won’t be my best work. Inspiration doesn’t have to be directly linked to a story. If a song has a certain feeling or mood, that can also be inspiring and drive creativity. Distractions – well we don’t need them, but they are normal and human, and we deal with them as best we can.

9. How important is having a plan in place for your music?

Plans are important, but you need many of them. You can have an overall plan to write, record, release music, but you need sub-plans, and further sub-plans. There’s plenty of planning as a band. Without a plan you’re just hoping things go well. Even with a plan, things can often not go the way you want. Make plans.

10. How important is your brand White Bay?

What’s important to us is that we enjoy the music we create and release, and we hope people can connect to our music and enjoy it themselves. We’re a serious rock band, but we’re all individually pretty relaxed and enjoy not taking our-selves too seriously. We’re hoping that comes across in the film clip! We’d like people to see us an accessible band they can interact with on a personal level and we’d like to build a culture around us that people, and ourselves, enjoy.

Dubarray

Dubarray have an album out called Inner Sanctum and this is what they had to say and go see them on tour

http://www.dubarray.com/

DUBARRAY

INNER SANCTUM | ALBUM TOUR DATES

May 31st – The Shared Yandina, Sunshine Coast, QLD

June 1st – Mandala Arts Cafe, Gold Coast, QLD

June 2nd – Sheok Shack, Fingal Heads, NSW

June 3rd – The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Heads, NSW

June 8th – 10th – Palm Creek Festival, Palm Creek, QLD

June 29th – Byron Bay Brewery, Byron Bay, QLD

June 30th – Full Moon Dance, Verridale, QLD

July 1st – The Bearded Lady, Brisbane, QLD

1. How did you get into music?

Hmmm. Music has always been a part of all our lives in someway or another. I guess music got into us at a young age is the best answer for that question.

2. How did the inspiration for the album come about?

The album’s theme was inspired by our research into the innate healing mechanisms of the body & the power of food being thy medicine. There are some light and shade’s throughout the whole album but the heavy stuff was also fuelled by personal experiences of our loved ones being challenged with health issues such as cancer, This also opened us up to the capitalist agenda behind the big pharma that is now our “health” industry. We named the album after the track ‘Inner Sanctum’ as we felt it summed up the albums journey and the timely importance of the message behind it. The track was also the oldest standing track on the album as we actually started writing it 4 years ago but it only grew wings recently.

3. How does a song start for you?

Sometimes a song will start with the lyrics & sometimes the song will start with a beat or a chord formation. We don’t really have a set way to write, we just await the inspiration in whatever shape or form it comes in from.

4. Where do you get your inspiration from?

Life and everything going on in and around it. We are also super inspired by other artists and hearing new music from our friends.

5. Has your songwriting changed from when you were starting out?

Not really. With this act it has always come in from a lot of different angles. We try to keep it as organic as possible which sometimes is hard when your dealing with electronics but somehow we find a nice balance.

6. What has been the best piece of advice you have given about your music career?

Always remember its about the music. Concentrate on writing good songs that connect with the crowd you want to attract and don’t worry too much about the rest as it will fall into place. Be ready to be versatile as well if you want to make a living out of it.

7. Do you have set theme for your music or does it go with the flow and changes?

We try to theme each album appropriately. This album was themed towards the innate healing ability where the last album ‘Sound of Prana’ was a soundscapes of the seven chakra & the album before that ‘Visions Collide’ was themed towards the collective conscious awakening.

8. Do like to write with out inspiration or distractions or do you need a bit of both?

We need to write without distraction but that’s always tough so we try to put ourselves in the best possible place for that to happen.

9. How important is having a plan in place for your music?

Its important to have plans in place for the release of the music, the touring and exposure of the music. But the writing I feel must happen organically from inspiration. You can plan to go one direction but your creative will take you in another so you have to be ready to adapt.

10. How important is your brand Dubarray?

Well if it wasn’t important we wouldn’t really be playing music under the name so I guess it is pretty important!

Emecia

Photo by Josh McCawley

Emecia are an awesome Australian band and they have their debut album out now and this is what they have to say.

https://www.facebook.com/emeciaofficial/

1. How did you get into music?

I grew up listening to my dad’s music collection, which comprised of mostly 80s rock and metal. He had cases of mix tapes he made over the years. A lot of stuff that was fast, aggressive and full of passion.

2. How did the inspiration for the album come about?

It was something we’ve wanted to do for years so it inevitably had to happen. It’s essentially a time capsule of thoughts and feelings; trials and tribulations that we’ve all encountered over the last few years. There are lots of things in there that nearly broke me but ultimately made me stronger.

3. How does a song start for you?

Thoughts float around in my head until I purge them on to paper. It usually starts off as a tangled mess. As I keep writing, I start to understand what I’m trying to express. The hard part is working out how to say it.

4. Where do you get your inspiration from?

Life. Things I see, hear, feel and experience. I draw inspiration from anything and everything.

5. Has your song writing changed from when you were starting out?

The way a song forms is still very similar, but these days we have our own little home studios, so the production side of things has become a lots more streamlined. It’s become a lot easier to start putting something together and then tweak it until we’re all happy with the result.

6. What has been the best piece of advice you have given about your music career?

Never expect anything.

7. Do you have set theme for your music or does it go with the flow and changes?

If it’s eating away at me, it’s probably what I’m writing about at the time. Writing, and just generally keeping creative, stops things from eternally rattling around in my skull.

8. Do like to write without inspiration or distractions or do you need a bit of both?

When I’m ready I write, I write. I don’t think you can force yourself to create. It happens when it happens. It’s a cathartic process, for sure.

9. How important is having a plan in place for your music?

Very. We are constantly setting ourselves new goals. It helps drive us to keep pushing forwards. I don’t ever want to fall back on being satisfied with what we’ve done. We always strive for better. Complacency is the death of art.

10. How important is your brand Emecia?

It’s a big part of me. It’s full of my blood, sweat and tears. It’s used as a tool to express things that I don’t know how to express in any other way.

Wing Defence

Photo by Nick Horvat

Wing Defence one of the most exciting bands coming out of Australia. I just had to interview the band, so read on and find out why you should get behind this band. Plus tell your friends you have discovered the next big thing.

https://www.facebook.com/pg/wingdefence/

1. What inspired the film clip?

Skye: We try to DIY pretty much everything we do in some way… So we took footage in and out of the studio and Paigy put it together… on her phone! We have so much fun in the studio so we thought this would be the best way to get people to know us a little better and really capture what we’re about.

2. Why edit it using an Iphone?

Paige: Honestly, I probably made it a lot more difficult for myself editing it on a iPhone but I didn’t have a Mac at the time so I just used the software on my phone, it’s a pretty simple software thankfully.

3. Are you happy with the response to the song Stuck?

We’re stoked! Everyone seems to be loving it so far and we’ve had some great reviews. It’s so nice for us to receive that response from people.

4. What inspired the song and how was the song constructed?

We were on our way to a gig discussing how we wanted to start a bit of pop rock punk project together when Skye played her iphone voice memo of Stuck (almost a year ago now) in the car and we thought it was fkn excellent! We took it to our first studio session together and fleshed out the rest of our ideas for the track with our producer and great mate Benny.

5. How does a song start for you?

I think for both of us we start with a guitar riff and a theme a it could be something either of us are currently or previously gone through and then the words flow from there. We’ll often have a studio session and sometimes write as we go or other times will both bring a song in and watch it grow in the session.

6. Where does inspiration come from?

Our lives, the lives of others, world issues, beer, Coke Zero, the dog

7. Do you have any more songs lined up to be released this year?

We are releasing our next single this May… so soon!! very very excited

8. What do you hope the rest of the year will have in store for you?

We can only hope that the next few songs we release are received well, I know we’re both proud of them. We’re also keen to get touring as soon as possible. Band rehearsals have been so much fun.

9. Have you much response from industry regarding your music?

Yeah, it’s been a bit overwhelming but in a really good and wholesome way.